I was only eight years old the last time I remember my parents coming home from church on a Wednesday night with ash on their foreheads. The sights and smells and sounds from St. Paul’s Anglican Church in Petaling Jaya, Malaysia, left an early impression on me. But I ought not overplay my hand. The bulk of my childhood memories of faith come from “non-denominational”, charismatic churches. There was the “full gospel” church in Malaysia that I attended from ages 8-10, and again at ages 13-17. The three years in between can be accounted for by my family’s move from Malaysia to Portland, Oregon, where my parents attended a Bible college that was connected to another “non-denominational” church with Pentecostal leanings. When I was 17, I left Malaysia to return to the States to attend a university that was by all counts “charismatic”. Thankfully I had theology professors who represented various streams of the Body of Christ, from Anglican to Catholic to Reformed to Pentecostal. Finally, for the last 10 years I’ve served on staff at a large “evangelical”, “non-denominational” church that believes in the activity and gifts of the Holy Spirit.

THE GLORY OF THE HISTORIC CHURCH CALENDAR
Needless to say, the notion of observing the historic Church Calendar was remote at best. It seemed like something “traditional” churches did, while the allegedly cutting edge churches followed the “leading of the Holy Spirit.” But I’m beginning to wonder if every church– even the ones that claim to order their year by the Spirit’s leading– has a calendar, an annual rhythm of sorts. In most of the non-denominational churches I’ve been in, there is the Small Group Kickoff in the Fall, a Festival for children involving candy and costumes that mysteriously lands on October 31st each year, there is a Christmas Pageant of sorts in early Winter, a Call to Prayer at the dawn of a new year, an Easter Outreach in the Spring, and then camps, conferences, and missions trips in the Summer. And it repeats in more or less the same manner each year. We have a Modern Church Calendar.

None of that is inherently problematic. Except when I began to compare it to the Historic Church Calendar. I realized that the Modern Church Calendar centers on what we are doing and invites God in while the Historic Church Calendar centers on what Christ has done and invites us to participate in His life, suffering, death, resurrection, and commission. One is about my activity, the other is about Christ’s; one is about the busyness of my pre-determined rhythms, the other is about interrupting my rhythms to bring my life into the cadence of Christ and His work. Advent, Christmas, Epiphany, Lent, Holy Week, Easter, Pentecost are occasions to stop our normal rhythms and begin paying attention to Christ and His work– His work on earth and His work at present through the Holy Spirit. Ironically, the Historic Church Calendar might do more to help us follow the leading of the Holy Spirit than the haphazard, self-focused, human-activity-driven events and programs that clutter the life of many non-denominational churches.

HOW DID LENT BEGIN?
In the Old Testament both Moses (Exodus 34:28) and Elijah (1 Kings 19:7) seem to have had 40-day periods of fasting for the purpose of devoting undivided attention to God, preparing them for a special work. Jesus, on the precipice of beginning His ministry, fasted for 40 days in the wilderness where He was tested and proved ready to begin. As a result, when the church leaders in the mid-2nd century were preparing candidates for baptism, they required the candidates to undergo a 40-day period of reflection, examination, and preparation before they were baptized on Easter morning. As early as the turn of the 3rd century there began to be a more formalized period of repentance and reflection before Easter as evidenced by one of St. Iraneus’s letters to the pope, though it seemed to last 40 hours rather than 40 days. The various ways of observing Lent became more homogenous after Christianity became legalized in the early 4th century, and even more so after the Council of Nicea in 325AD, making it the 40-day period we are now familiar with. It was Pope Gregory the Great in the early 7th century who moved Lent from beginning on a Sunday to begin on a Wednesday (called Ash Wednesday) so that the Sundays during the Lenten season could be mini-Easters, or mini-feast days.

WHAT’S THE PURPOSE FOR LENT?
The purpose of Lent is prayer, self-examination and repentance, sacrifices and acts of service in preparation for Easter. It’s main components, historically, have been fasting and prayer. Like any other occasion of fasting, the goal is to let go of things in our lives that are not inherently harmful or destructive in order to give our attention to Christ in a special way. It is a letting go of the good for the sake of the laying hold of the best that Christ has offered. For the great part of church history, Lent has been about dietary restrictions, with Sundays being the “feast days” where you get a brief reprieve.

It is a way to “know Christ in the fellowship of His sufferings“(Phil. 3:10-11), to share in it with Him, so that we might experience the life, the resurrection, of Easter in a fresh way. It is a way of preparing us to live in perpetual Easter– the life of Christ springing up anew in us as we lay down and let go of control and selfishness.

So, what should you give up? Whatever it is that you feel has more of a hold on you that it should, or simply anything that would represent a sacrifice, and the elimination of which would free up time and energy to focus upon Christ.

What am I giving up? This is hard to say: Twitter, Facebook, and blogging….for both the reasons above. So, starting on Wednesday, I’ll only tweet, Facebook, or blog on Sundays…if at all…until Easter. May you know Christ more deeply this Lenten season.

Shalom.

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26 thoughts on “Why I’m Observing Lent This Year

  1. Glen, Jesus said He only did what He saw His Father in heaven doing. Consequently, His fast in the wilderness was absolutely the Father’s plan for Him for that time. However, mimicking our lives after church traditions, rather than after the leading of the Holy Spirit is a dangerous and lifeless practice. Dangerous in that man’s endeavors to cleanse himself from unrighteousness produces all kinds of condemnation and failure. It is the job of the Holy Spirit to lead us into truth. I believe in fasting, but not as a formula for righteousness, but rather a spirit led instrument in our lives. A “Church led” fast is not only without scriptural basis, it also can be such a tool of the enemy for leading people into the bondage of works and performance and self-righteous arrogance and condemnation. I have seen so much damage coming from the unbiblical concept of Lent, and I just want to challenge you: if you are fed up with mordern day church traditions, rather than replace them with traditions from the Catholic church, lead a “traditionless” Holy Spirit led life according to the Word. Don’t let traditions dictate your walk, either in a reaction to them or in the lure that self-purification seems to have for this generation. If the Holy Spirit is leading you into a fast then go for it, but as a pastor, I challenge you to encourage it only to be done by the leading of the Holy Spirit and not as an adherance to a lifeless church tradition. Sorry if this comes accross strongly, but the trap and abuse caused by Lent are so seductively binding the people of God, and it just makes me want to fight for the finished work of Jesus and the role of the Holy Spirit in our lives. The church has always tried to add to what Jesus has done by adding our own puny efforts to his magnificent grace, but I truly believe it is “another gospel” (Gal 1). It is salvation + circucision, or salvation + lent… if it is not by the Spirit, it is a dead work.
    Sincerely,

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  2. Tracy, I appreciate your thoughts. To be clear, I’m not fed up with traditions. On the contrary, I’m fed up with people who claim to be Spirit-led and despise traditions as a result. Jesus followed all kinds of Jewish customs and traditions– going to Temple, celebrating Passover, etc. In fact, God– the Father– gave those traditions to the Jewish nation so that we would all learn the power of repeated behavior…living in a rhythm. The notion of being Spirit-led is often an excuse to be lazy and inactive.
    I believe that a rhythm– a tradition, a routine, whatever you would like to call it– is how we reinforce our desire. I have a desire to keep my teeth, so I have a “tradition” of brushing them every day. I have a desire to grow in knowing my wife, so we have a “tradition” of a Tuesday night date night, with a babysitter pre-scheduled. God knows we would never simply do the things we ought or pay attention to His work in the midst of our normal busyness without the rhythms, routines, traditions to help.
    Surely you are not so simple-minded to think I’m implying a Jesus + anything Gospel. I never said that. Peter– and Paul– are emphatic that our daily response to God’s grace at work in us is “to make every effort…” Lent is an occasion to do just that. I don’t you think you came across too strong, but I do think it might be a bit ignorant and arrogant to speak dismissively of “all things Catholic”. Even the great reformer Martin Luther considered the Church pure and good up to a certain point in its history. Luther praised Gregory the Great (7th century) as the last great pope up until his day (15th century). It would do you good to remember that for the first thousand years or so there was only one church…and it was the one we call Catholic.

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  3. Glen,
    Great post. One of the best blog posts I have read in a long time. I grew up catholic, came to Christ in a Pentecostal Church, served and Assemblies of God Church in Colorado Springs and now am Pastoring a Non-Denominational church in Wisconsin. All that to say God has taken me on an incredible journey. When I left the Catholic church I left behind all things liturgical. Now that I have grow and find myself more centered in Christ I am fascinated with the church calender because of how strongly it points to Christ. Their is so much life in being spirit led and allowing a calendar of sorts to set aside time for focus and reflection. Thanks again for a GREAT post

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  4. Hey Tracy…I have felt awful since hitting “post” on my previous comment for the line about being “simple-minded”. That was patronizing and condescending. I’m sorry. Sincerely.
    I do want to clarify that Paul– and anyone else who criticizes a “Jesus +” gospel– is right to do so. But a “Jesus +” gospel is anything we add as a requirement for salvation. Paul was harsh on the Judaizers in Galatia because they were preaching circumcision as a means of salvation. I am not preaching Lent as a means of salvation. Christ is the center of our faith. And there are practices, habits, etc that help us engage Christ on a daily basis. If Lent it not that for you, that’s fine. But I don’t think you should call an 1800-year-old practice bondage. After all, the notion of a daily “quiet time” with personal Bible reading is only about 150 years old (the Bible was always read in groups not privately). How would you feel about that being called a bondage? Or free-flowing “open worship”, a practice only about 30 years old…is that bondage too? No. Such talk is the source of division among the Body of Christ. We are all to engage the living Christ daily in surrender and worship…and there are many practices that help. Lent is simply one of the oldest.

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  5. Glenn,
    As a charismatic believer who has almost the exact background you have (except for the Malasian born and raised part…you have me on that one LOL) I have to agree with what you are getting at. I am a worship leader who doesnt like Christmas music, old hymns for hymn sake, or singing “holiday songs” on holidays. I believe the reason is because in my charismatic tradition, anything structured was man, unstructured was God because it “felt more spiritual”. I think what you are saying in “lay terms” is, the tradition and act of lent while maybe a dead tradition to many in the church today because it is only a tradition, while combined with the spirit filled life and commitment, can bring about a revelation and rhythm to our lives that can bring tremendous meaning to our walk with Christ. If I could clarify, I think you are saying that lent can “help” amplify the wonder and amazing love our God showed us at the cross. It is like a reminder of His sacrifice, it brings focus.
    I am not a fan of tradition…but I am a fan of new revelations of God’s love and grace to us…and if a simple act of submission on my part can focus me better on His ways and His love, well then I too embrace the Lenten season. May we never become so “fearful” of looking to the past and traditions for dear of being irrelevant that we miss a chance for God to open a new revelation to us of who He is.

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  6. Glenn, I appreciate your voice of balance in a world of extremes. There are good aspects of most expressions of our Christian faith. Sort of the whole “describing the elephant” analogy. 🙂

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  7. The modern anti-tradition sentiment is very recent. It speaks more to our pride and selfishness than to the “move of the Spirit.” It is an unfortunate development in contemporary spirituality. This destroys the linkages between today’s issues and our spiritual fathers. We dismiss the millions that have come before us a stuck in tradition. But we forget, who was it that preserved the scriptures? Who was it that endured persecution? Who was it that held tight to the teachings and passed them down? Who was it that articulated the Creed and the Trinity?
    It can only be God if I feel it? It can only be God if it is new a fresh? This itself is a tradition and not support by scripture or history.
    May we all repent and be converted to Christ.

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  8. Another “Gospel +” possibility is “Gospel + no tradition.” I would hate to avoid celebrating the resurrection at Easter, or the birth of Jesus at Christmastime. In fact, those times of communal observance of the great work of God (all of which have root in the liturgical church calendar) can be powerful; properly observed, they are, as Glenn says, part of the lively rhythm of the church’s witness to the gospel. They help us remember and re-live the great story of Jesus.
    Lent has never been a trap for me, nor a form of abuse. On the contrary, it’s something I look forward to each and every year not least because I know that so many of my brothers and sisters in Christ will be joining with me in a season of fasting and prayer and contemplation. It’s powerful, and, I believe, Spirit-led, for me as for many of my friends, both Catholic and Protestant.
    I think Tracy has the right intention, which is a dedicated heart to God, free from the constraints of man-made religion. But God’s rain continues to pour upon all types of Christian witness, both old expressions and new, and I think Glenn is right to want to recover some of the strengths of historical Christianity.

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  9. ken….love your language about lent “amplifying our wonder and amazement at God.” I would only challenge you that traditions are how we (1) reinforce our desire for God, and (2) preserve truth about God. lose them and we are left with a “god” we have fashioned according to our own feelings and desires.
    thirsty…always love what you have to say on this subject. still waiting for you to email me an 800-word guest post on the topic. 🙂
    pd…brilliant comparisons. thanks for sharing your story as well.
    terra…thanks. we are all HIS body.
    mr. basscase….that’s tomorrow night….but no special plans on my part.

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  10. Glen, no problem on the simple minded comment 🙂 I think we may be coming from very different places on this issue. As a participant in “Lent” or fasting, if you are personally being led into it.. I say go for it. However, what I take issue with in Lent is the imposition of it onto the Body as something that is mandatory coming from a pastor. I take issue with the imposition of traditions that aren’t demonstrated in the life of Christ or in the word under the New Covenant. Jesus performed every feast and every detail of the law so that we wouldn’t have to. He fulfilled the law. If you are looking for what he requires of us, look at his disciples. If a tradition of a month of fasting was part of His message, why didn’t He drag His disciples into the wilderness to fast with Him? He went into that wilderness… led by the Holy Spirit. Jesus was on His own journey in the fulfillment of the law. A law that Paul says now is death to us. We were never supposed to be able to keep the law by ourselves and the many requirements of it just pointed out our great need for a Savior. If we try to keep part of it, then the Bible says that we are required to keep all of it ()
    These “traditions” that you speak fondly of become a law to people. They become a heavy weight of performance and self cleansing just like the rituals of the OT. That is why I spoke of adding to the finished work of Jesus. When I celebrate what He has done and walk in that, chains fall off of me. When I focus on my chains and mourn my retched state, the chains just seem to get stronger. It is not by our might, but by His power that we get free from our sin and from the junk in our lives.
    I also take very seriously the fact that Lent is not scriptural. To me, it doesn’t matter how long people have been doing it. It has just been a pathway to bondage for that long. People went looking for a way to purge their own flesh, because simply recieving seems so hard. We feel like we need to “Do” something. It feels so good to your flesh to beat yourself up for your sins… but it is not the message of the gospel.
    In answer to your rebuttal, open worship may be new to the formal church, but David did it with abandon. It finds it’s foundation in scripture. Personal Bible reading is a liberty we enjoy with the invention of the printing press, but it isn’t a tenant of our faith. It is healthy, it is a vibrant part of knowing our heavenly Father, but I would take issue with a Church mandating a quiet time in order to reach intimacy with God. There are wonderful elements that we participate in as part of our faith, but we don’t make them laws.
    I totally embrace fasting as a Holy Spirit led process that can be a wonderful element in your walk of faith, but this month of morning and mandatory fasting called Lent so easily becomes a yolk around people’s necks. I have talked to people that feel so condemned during this month that they just skip church entirely. They know they will fail at the fast and they feel beaten up before they even start. I have talked to many vibrant Christians who are reaching the lost and passionate about Jesus and whose churches do “Lent” and they all describe it as a time of darkness that they dread. How is this God? Where He leads there is life and light. When He has led me into fasts I have felt such joy to be doing it and excitement at His purpose in it. However, a ritual of fasting done under the yolk of tradition does not produce this life.
    I would further like to say that just because a tradition is old, does not make it life giving or scriptural.
    OK, got to make dinner 🙂

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  11. Glenn,
    I really appreciate that you have taken up this subject. It seems that God is reviving a living liturgy all around the world, in many different parts of the body of Christ. I believe ancient church practices are something we really need to consider. As lawlessness increases we need simple disciplines that will keep us focused on Christ.
    I agree as you said, that”the Historic Church Calendar might do more to help us follow the leading of the Holy Spirit than the…self-focused, human-activity-driven events and programs that clutter the life of many…churches.”
    I might add that the Catholic church has much to offer in it’s Jesus centered mass, that we non-denominational/evangelical/charasmatic’s lack in our media driven services.
    The fact is we need stability in our lives as believers like never before, and a simple discipline like following the Historic Church calendar…in order to draw close to Jesus can really help us. It also connects us with our historical roots as Christians. We can only see as far as our forefathers have taken us. We are sitting on their shoulders.
    Ps. Because of this blog, I went online and grabbed a copy of the Historical Church Calendar for myself. Thanks!

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  12. anthony– great to hear!
    tracy– hope dinner was great! could you send some my way? 🙂 listen, i think i know where you’re coming from and i understand it to a degree. please know that i am not telling “my people” to observe Lent as a sort of law. in fact, i’m not sure Lent has ever been a law. there is a difference between a law and a tradition. a tradition can help preserve things that need to be preserved (as “thirsty” pointed out in his comments)…and to reinforces our desire for God (as i’ve tried to say).
    a side note about the law: Jesus did not come to abolish it but to fulfill it (he said so Himself)…and when we are in Christ we are counted before the Father as being righteous…thank God! as the Holy Spirit continues His work in us, one of the “signs of grace” is that He begins to conform us to His image…i.e. that we actually do fulfill the law in heart and in action (phil 2:12-13). in other words, the law was not a random set of rules designed to frustrate us…it reveals God’s nature: He is not for hate or murder or lust or adultery, etc. We don’t keep the law to EARN our salvation; but as Paul wrote to the Philipians, we SHOW our salvation (his words are “work out”, but it means to let our salvation play out) by our attitude and actions.
    the bottom line is that if you don’t feel that Lent helps you to engage the Living Christ then don’t observe it. but don’t begrudge those who do. we are all the Body of Christ.

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  13. Mr Glenn Packiam,
    My name is Aaron Porras, and I’m nineteen. I’m from a small town in Texas and I attend a non-denominational church with about 30 members. It also believe in the Holy Spirit. Since we’re so small we do not really have much ties to bigger churches or ties to many resources involving seminary or theology schools. Thats why I contacted you on this blog and I hope I don’t frustrate you for not being on topic at all, but I was wanting to know of seminary school that would be non-denominational and believes in the Holy Spirit. If you could give me more information on schools like that. What school would you attend now knowing what you know and where God has brought you?
    I read your blogs all the time , I get “schooled up” everytime I read them. You take an approach to church topics or bible topics in a way that is not really preached or taught now a days, because this type of teaching has been lost in the midst of America’s “christian culture.” Or at least in this part of the U.S it has.Thank God for using you in this way. I especially was blessed by the blog which was posted about leading worship and what you wish you knew ten years ago.
    I don’t know if its the schooling or if its just God giving you the wisdom. Well I know it’s God but the schooling helps. I read my bible, but I just want to learn so much more. I want to know certain dates that are important I want to know the history of each book I just want so much more.
    Why waste my time in anything else when all it comes down to is God. If I major in radiology which is what I’m currently majoring in what does that do for me in God’s eyes? How does that store treasures for me in heaven . When I die and go to heaven what will be the point of knowing how to read an x-ray or every bone in the body. I dont think we’ll have bones up there ……thats a joke but who knows. I just know that I would much rather spend my time in his word and learning about it then anything else. People have asked me how do you know thats God’s plan in your life Aaron…..I say what else would God want me to do. I guess in way that kind of ties in to this whole lent topic . Would God rather have us spending thirty minutes to two hours watcing t.v or blogging or facebooking etc. Or would he rather have us fasting those things or even food to spend time in his word or in prayer. Even if it is a tradition. Sometimes I dont feel the spirit nudging me to pray or read my Bible and I still do it and in that time I feel the Holy Spirit take over and I read and hear and feel God’s presence.I hear God telling me what I need to change in my life and where and what he wants to use me in. Possilbly this could be what lent could turn into a tradition or whatever turing into a spirit filled occasion where God takes us to a whole new level.Maybe this is just my experience maybe this whole comment is very simple minded as you all have said , but it is just what i feel . I know i would rather be doing something then nothing if its a way that could bless me spiritually . I know that i have things that I could fast for a while or for life that aren’t really benifitting me in any way, but who knows I’m no scholar or theology major.
    God Bless,
    Aaron Porras
    I was also wondering about some books I could read that could help me out in learning more.

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  14. Glenn… I love the dialogue you have initiated here. And how wonderful to hear the way you have become so open to some of the traditions of the church. I spent years in several charismatic, non denominational churches before truly appreciating the power of the ancient/future church. I remember participating in a wedding in our Anglican church and asking the rector if I could pray my own prayers over the couple. He said absolutely yes, but when I read the prayers in the Book of Common Prayer for marriage, I was astounded. How could I ever pray as PASSIONATELY as the prayers of these past warriors of God. So I prayed both the rich prayers of the past along with the personal prayers for the couple. It was very rich.
    That began my quest to better understanding some of the ancient liturgy of the church. Of course it can be bondage, but so can the informal liturgy of the “non denominational” church. The key is the condition of the heart. As Jesus said to the woman at the well, it is “worship in spirit and truth” that makes the difference.
    So now as part of a charismatic Anglican body of believers, I am finding a renewed sense of connection with the rich liturgy of the church enhanced by the POWER of spirit-led worship. It is truly “ancient future” worship, and weekly the meaning grows.

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  15. Glenn, great post. As you know, I have a similar background, except mine began in the Catholic church. However we were ‘bad’ Catholics who didn’t observe the traditions strictly! However, it was in the Catholic church that I had spiritual ‘awareness’, and the HS was alive and well and working in this church, and we as a family were introduced to the power of the Holy Spirit.
    I really like what you said about living in a rhythm and since having a child, this truth has really hit home. Kids thrive on a routine, and I think we do too.
    And I think having a good routine can actually enables freedom and spontaneity.
    I think whatever people choose to do or not to do, the difference is to choose and do it purposefully. Am I making sense?
    Tracy, I the Church led fast can be a good thing that builds community and encourages people to refocus on God, and for those who have not tried the discipline of prayer and fasting, doing it as a community is a great way to start.
    For me personally, just doing it mostly quietly, by myself, it’s making such a difference, just reminding me to give God more of myself, remembering Him more, and remembering that it is indeed by His grace alone, as you said, that I am saved.

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  16. Tracy, some of your statements assume strange false dichotomies. Why should people like I, reject the traditions of the church (catholic or not! I know plenty of protestants who do lent) if we feel it deepens our relationship with God? Why should we assume that tradition and the work of the Holy Spirit are opposite? I do not feel that Lent is “imposed” on me. I do it because I feel it deepens my life with God and God’s people. This is hardly a lifeless tradition for many people. -and I’m ex-pentecostal by the way who on rare occasions still prays in tongues.
    Also, Glenn brought up some good points that all churches have a defacto, implicit, Calendars. Are you SURE that your church has NO “traditions” or tradition just a dirty word you apply to other people?
    Regarding the “no scriptural basis” reasoning, that’s kind of moot. Christians do a lot of things that have “no scriptural basis” -like commenting on blogs!

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  17. After reading the posts, this is what I have to say about Lent— rather, this is what Paul had to say.
    Col- 2- Therefore do not let anyone judge you by what you eat or drink, or with regard to a religious festival, a New Moon celebration or a Sabbath day.
    17These are a shadow of the things that were to come; the reality, however, is found in Christ.
    18Do not let anyone who delights in false humility and the worship of angels disqualify you for the prize.
    Such a person goes into great detail about what he has seen, and his unspiritual mind puffs him up with idle notions.
    19He has lost connection with the Head, from whom the whole body, supported and held together by its ligaments and sinews, grows as God causes it to grow.
    –> Back to Craig– The freedom that Paul talked about was the freedom of believers to not be subject to the Jewish regulations and laws AND festivals.
    Moreover, Paul says concerning festivals and rituals–
    23Such regulations indeed have an appearance of wisdom, with their self-imposed worship, their false humility and their harsh treatment of the body, but they lack any value in restraining sensual indulgence.

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  18. After reading the posts, this is what I have to say about Lent— rather, this is what Paul had to say.
    Col- 2- Therefore do not let anyone judge you by what you eat or drink, or with regard to a religious festival, a New Moon celebration or a Sabbath day.
    17These are a shadow of the things that were to come; the reality, however, is found in Christ.
    18Do not let anyone who delights in false humility and the worship of angels disqualify you for the prize.
    Such a person goes into great detail about what he has seen, and his unspiritual mind puffs him up with idle notions.
    19He has lost connection with the Head, from whom the whole body, supported and held together by its ligaments and sinews, grows as God causes it to grow.
    –> Back to Craig– The freedom that Paul talked about was the freedom of believers to not be subject to the Jewish regulations and laws AND festivals.
    Moreover, Paul says concerning festivals and rituals–
    23Such regulations indeed have an appearance of wisdom, with their self-imposed worship, their false humility and their harsh treatment of the body, but they lack any value in restraining sensual indulgence.

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  19. I am an editor for Christian.com which is a social network dedicated to the christian community. As I look through your web site I feel a collaboration is at hand. I would be inclined to acknowledge your website offering it to our users as I’m sure our Pentecostal audience would benefit from what your site has to offer. I look forward to your thoughts or questions regarding the matter.
    Vicky Silvers
    vicky.silvers@gmail.com

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